Vaccination station: get your pet vaccination schedule right with Oneplan

   

Jade Poole from I write words

    0
Vaccination station

Take a break from the COVID-19 vaccination cadenza and focus on another important matter: getting your young pets vaccinated on time!

All year it’s been “vaccination this” and “vaccination that”, which is both exciting and exhausting, we get it. Whichever side of the fence you fall on when it comes to human vaccines, don’t make the pet-parenting mistake of skipping vaccinations for your furry-friends.

What are vaccinations?

Because both humans and animals are susceptible to certain viral and bacterial diseases, vaccinations are developed to protect our immune systems when a certain virus enters the body. A vaccine works by a controlled dose of a virus or virus variant being injected into the body, giving the immune system a chance to produce effective antibodies for that particular virus. Once antibodies are developed, they stay in the body for a certain amount of time (which is why we have a schedule handy) and for that period, should that virus enter the body, your pet’s antibodies will keep them healthy.

Why does my young pet need so many shots?

Look at that face - how could they be expected to be a disease-fighting-machine so small? Kittens and puppies have most of their vaccinations within the first few months of their life because they aren’t born with naturally strong immune systems. Young animals will access some antibodies through their mother’s milk which will sustain their health for their first few weeks of life but can also interfere with the effectiveness of certain vaccines, which is why puppies and kittens need to have a couple of or multiple consistent vaccinations to ensure they are immune.

Kittens will start off with 2 initial vaccinations and the best age to vaccinate would be 9 and 12 weeks. Puppies need 3 initial vaccinations for optimal protection in their formative months and the ideal ages for their shots are 6, 9 and 12 weeks.

What should I vaccinate for?

Depending on the lifestyle of your pet, your vet will advise vaccinating for different viruses. There are core vaccinations and non-core vaccinations. You and your vet will talk about what you plan to do with your pet (shows, trail running) or where you want to travel with them and your vet will propose any non-core vaccinations to go along with the core ones.

Core vaccinations for dogs

●        Parvovirus-2

●        Canine distemper

●        Canine hepatitis (Adenovirus type 1)

Core vaccinations for kittens

●        Feline Leukaemia Virus

●        Feline Infectious Enteritis

●        Cat 'flu'

What are booster vaccinations?

Your pet will receive their vaccinations at a young age to get their bodies familiar with producing antibodies, but this won’t protect them forever. This is why we have booster shots. A vaccine has a certain lifespan in an animal's body and your vet will be able to give you this information. Dogs need to be vaccinated

Puppy Vaccine Schedule (after initial vaccinations)

Like we mentioned before, your puppy will have their initial vaccinations at 6, 9 or 12 weeks old. Thereafter here is a guide for how many weeks after those shots you need to take your pup to the vet for a boost!

11 - 13 weeks

●       Infectious hepatitis

●       Canine distemper

●       Canine parvovirus

 

15 - 17 weeks

●       Rabies

●       Leptospirosis

 

15 months

●       Infectious hepatitis

●       Canine distemper

●       Canine parvovirus

●       Rabies

●       Leptospirosis

 

Annually

●       Infectious hepatitis

●       Canine distemper

●       Canine parvovirus

●       Rabies

●       Leptospirosis

Kitten vaccine schedule

Cats need 2 initial vaccinations and your vet will be able to tell you when the booster vaccination will be needed depending on the type of vaccination they use. As a general rule, three core viruses will be vaccinated against at 8 and 12 weeks of age:

 

●        Feline Leukaemia Virus

●        Feline Infectious Enteritis (also called Panleucopenia or Feline Parvovirus)

●        Cat 'flu'

●        Rabies

 

Don’t forget to speak to your vet about non-core vaccines for your kitten for chlamydia, rabies, bordetella.

Oneplan and Vaccinations

Hopefully, you get the idea of how worthwhile vaccinating your pet is. Prevention is always the best cure so make sure you get your ducks (or cats and dogs) in a row and get your pets vaccinated on time. Oneplan has four plans, two of which offer vaccinations as a part of routine care cover.

Our plans are as follows:

●        Pet Accident Cover

●        Pet Hospital Plan

●         Pet Classic Plan

●         Pet Super Plan

 

If you’re looking for an insurance policy that is always comprehensive and covers you for vaccinations, we would suggest taking a look through our Pet Classic Plan and our Pet Super Plan.

 

Yours in tail-wag-worthy insurance,

Oneplan



Related posts

Cover your family, and get Oneplan Health Insurance

GET A QUOTE